Judy's Dutch Barn Farm Blog

Book recommendations

When we're not weeding or feeding we spend our free time reading about beginner farmers, farming, and food and history.

Written by the chef of Blue Hill at Sone Barns, The Third Plate looks at what we're eating and what it all means.  Dan Barber comments on food by looking at the farming that brings it to his kitchen.

This is a series of essays on farming philosophy and sustainability.  This collection of works is base on Mr Kirschenmann's experiences on his North Dakata farm.

Farms with a Future is a how-to guide for the beginner small farmer.  Rebecca Thistlethwaite has put together important perspectives from farm owners and managers accross the country to bring home lessons all focused on sustainability.

Judy


Recipes

Here are some of my favorite recipes.  Needless to say, they're all better with fresh, local ingredients.

If you're a fan of lamb then you can find a lot more recipes on the fans of lamb web site.

This year's garden

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Monday, March 4, 2013 Under: Vegetables

It’s said that March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb.  But we’re not focused on lions or lambs right now. We’re wildly finishing up seed and tree orders for the year. We’re late (as usual) but one feature still makes it fun – seed catalogs.  These magazines are to gardeners what cooking shows are to eaters.  They are visual gold.  Their pages promise a perfect garden, big enough to feed twenty with dead straight rows, no weeds and unfailing light rains every three or four days.

The catalogs are full of practical advice, but they sell dreams too.

This year’s garden will have five varieties of tomatoes and three kinds of beets.  But this year, we won’t plant 50 squash plants.  However, we  just might buy a packet of seeds for those giant pumpkins.  We will get a ready supply of horse manure from the neighbors.  As long as it’s still March, I can convince myself that I will diligently feed and water the plants and I will register the best of the yield for the County Fair. In May, after the catalogs are gone and the weeds are rallying, it will be a different world.  But right now, it’s March.

In : Vegetables 



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This year's garden

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Monday, March 4, 2013 Under: Vegetables

It’s said that March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb.  But we’re not focused on lions or lambs right now. We’re wildly finishing up seed and tree orders for the year. We’re late (as usual) but one feature still makes it fun – seed catalogs.  These magazines are to gardeners what cooking shows are to eaters.  They are visual gold.  Their pages promise a perfect garden, big enough to feed twenty with dead straight rows, no weeds and unfailing light rains every three or four days.

The catalogs are full of practical advice, but they sell dreams too.

This year’s garden will have five varieties of tomatoes and three kinds of beets.  But this year, we won’t plant 50 squash plants.  However, we  just might buy a packet of seeds for those giant pumpkins.  We will get a ready supply of horse manure from the neighbors.  As long as it’s still March, I can convince myself that I will diligently feed and water the plants and I will register the best of the yield for the County Fair. In May, after the catalogs are gone and the weeds are rallying, it will be a different world.  But right now, it’s March.

In : Vegetables 



blog comments powered by Disqus

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