Judy's Dutch Barn Farm Blog

Book recommendations

When we're not weeding or feeding we spend our free time reading about beginner farmers, farming, and food and history.

Written by the chef of Blue Hill at Sone Barns, The Third Plate looks at what we're eating and what it all means.  Dan Barber comments on food by looking at the farming that brings it to his kitchen.

This is a series of essays on farming philosophy and sustainability.  This collection of works is base on Mr Kirschenmann's experiences on his North Dakata farm.

Farms with a Future is a how-to guide for the beginner small farmer.  Rebecca Thistlethwaite has put together important perspectives from farm owners and managers accross the country to bring home lessons all focused on sustainability.

Judy


Recipes

Here are some of my favorite recipes.  Needless to say, they're all better with fresh, local ingredients.

If you're a fan of lamb then you can find a lot more recipes on the fans of lamb web site.

The Chick's in the mail

Posted by Judy St Leger on Saturday, June 4, 2011 Under: Chickens

That’s right. Chicks, not checks.



Today, at 6:30 in the morning we got a phone call from the post-office. “Your chicks have arrived” said the postmistress. We were at the back door to the Fort Plain post office by 7:00am and driving home a box of chicks by 7:15. The US postal service has always had a policy of shipping day old chicks. When the chicks are first hatched, they have a small yolk sac in their bellies. During the shipment from Lancaster, PA to upstate NY, they absorb this yolk sac. It provides all of the fluids and nutrition thay need suring the journey.

I won’t lie, I was eager to have them arrive. Chicks are subject to chilling during shipment. Even though they are in the good hands of the USPS, it was COLD where we live last night. We ordered the chicks over 3 weeks ago from Kendall Fox, a small hatchery man in PA. Kendall runs his business as tight as a ship. He doesn’t even set the eggs until you order them. So planning ahead is important if you want chicks from him. He ships chicks on Wednesdays, so be ready for them to arrive on Thursday or Friday. If you aren’t ready, those chicks can’t wait. Once they have absorbed the yolk sacs, they need some food and water. They are ready to fend for themselves.

The chicks we are raising this year are a breed called “Freedom Rangers”. Yes, it’s a hokey name. But they are better adapted to the free range life style than last year’s Cornish Crosses. I hope to raise them in 12 weeks (instead of eight). I expect them to be stronger, fitter, and a better bird having lived a better life on pasture than last year’s chickens.

I’m off to order the electric fence – we’ll need it in 2-3 weeks. More about that once it gets here.




In : Chickens 



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The Chick's in the mail

Posted by Judy St Leger on Saturday, June 4, 2011 Under: Chickens

That’s right. Chicks, not checks.



Today, at 6:30 in the morning we got a phone call from the post-office. “Your chicks have arrived” said the postmistress. We were at the back door to the Fort Plain post office by 7:00am and driving home a box of chicks by 7:15. The US postal service has always had a policy of shipping day old chicks. When the chicks are first hatched, they have a small yolk sac in their bellies. During the shipment from Lancaster, PA to upstate NY, they absorb this yolk sac. It provides all of the fluids and nutrition thay need suring the journey.

I won’t lie, I was eager to have them arrive. Chicks are subject to chilling during shipment. Even though they are in the good hands of the USPS, it was COLD where we live last night. We ordered the chicks over 3 weeks ago from Kendall Fox, a small hatchery man in PA. Kendall runs his business as tight as a ship. He doesn’t even set the eggs until you order them. So planning ahead is important if you want chicks from him. He ships chicks on Wednesdays, so be ready for them to arrive on Thursday or Friday. If you aren’t ready, those chicks can’t wait. Once they have absorbed the yolk sacs, they need some food and water. They are ready to fend for themselves.

The chicks we are raising this year are a breed called “Freedom Rangers”. Yes, it’s a hokey name. But they are better adapted to the free range life style than last year’s Cornish Crosses. I hope to raise them in 12 weeks (instead of eight). I expect them to be stronger, fitter, and a better bird having lived a better life on pasture than last year’s chickens.

I’m off to order the electric fence – we’ll need it in 2-3 weeks. More about that once it gets here.




In : Chickens 



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