Judy's Dutch Barn Farm Blog

Book recommendations

When we're not weeding or feeding we spend our free time reading about beginner farmers, farming, and food and history.

Written by the chef of Blue Hill at Sone Barns, The Third Plate looks at what we're eating and what it all means.  Dan Barber comments on food by looking at the farming that brings it to his kitchen.

This is a series of essays on farming philosophy and sustainability.  This collection of works is base on Mr Kirschenmann's experiences on his North Dakata farm.

Farms with a Future is a how-to guide for the beginner small farmer.  Rebecca Thistlethwaite has put together important perspectives from farm owners and managers accross the country to bring home lessons all focused on sustainability.

Judy


Recipes

Here are some of my favorite recipes.  Needless to say, they're all better with fresh, local ingredients.

If you're a fan of lamb then you can find a lot more recipes on the fans of lamb web site.

Making hay while the sun shines

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Monday, July 22, 2013 Under: Farm Life

Farming involves a lot of looking forward and hoping.  All through June we were hoping the rains would stop – and worried that they wouldn’t.  On the 28th of June the Otsquago Creek swelled,  jumped its banks, and flooded the village of Fort Plain.  In those days hope was hard to find amid the sadness.  Here are some pictures of the devastation.

It was heartwarming to see the efforts of the neighbors going into the affected area to clean-up, but shocking to see how much damage there was.  Marc and I went down for one day.  After this experience, we will never store much in the basement.

Two weeks later the sun finally came out.  Regardless of how wet June was, last weekend was dry enough to the cut hay.   The fields delivered much more hay than usual–it grew for an extra month and it got all the rain it could ever want.  We worked all weekend and finished up on Monday.  Now, the fields look like a 90 acre lawn. The barns are full of sweet smelling bales of summertime to distribute daily when the winter rolls around.



My worries in June seem so foolish now.  Now, we hope for August to be breezy and not too hot, and not too dry.

In : Farm Life 



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Making hay while the sun shines

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Monday, July 22, 2013 Under: Farm Life

Farming involves a lot of looking forward and hoping.  All through June we were hoping the rains would stop – and worried that they wouldn’t.  On the 28th of June the Otsquago Creek swelled,  jumped its banks, and flooded the village of Fort Plain.  In those days hope was hard to find amid the sadness.  Here are some pictures of the devastation.

It was heartwarming to see the efforts of the neighbors going into the affected area to clean-up, but shocking to see how much damage there was.  Marc and I went down for one day.  After this experience, we will never store much in the basement.

Two weeks later the sun finally came out.  Regardless of how wet June was, last weekend was dry enough to the cut hay.   The fields delivered much more hay than usual–it grew for an extra month and it got all the rain it could ever want.  We worked all weekend and finished up on Monday.  Now, the fields look like a 90 acre lawn. The barns are full of sweet smelling bales of summertime to distribute daily when the winter rolls around.



My worries in June seem so foolish now.  Now, we hope for August to be breezy and not too hot, and not too dry.

In : Farm Life 



blog comments powered by Disqus

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