Judy's Dutch Barn Farm Blog

Book recommendations

When we're not weeding or feeding we spend our free time reading about beginner farmers, farming, and food and history.

Written by the chef of Blue Hill at Sone Barns, The Third Plate looks at what we're eating and what it all means.  Dan Barber comments on food by looking at the farming that brings it to his kitchen.

This is a series of essays on farming philosophy and sustainability.  This collection of works is base on Mr Kirschenmann's experiences on his North Dakata farm.

Farms with a Future is a how-to guide for the beginner small farmer.  Rebecca Thistlethwaite has put together important perspectives from farm owners and managers accross the country to bring home lessons all focused on sustainability.

Judy


Recipes

Here are some of my favorite recipes.  Needless to say, they're all better with fresh, local ingredients.

If you're a fan of lamb then you can find a lot more recipes on the fans of lamb web site.

Blame it on the weeds

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Friday, July 22, 2011 Under: Vegetables


First it was the cress. Lovely little bitter leaves to spice up salads. They were such delicate little leaves. Then salad greens. They were wonderful mixed green and red ruffles of lettuce that showed that we could raise our own food.



Then the bok choy ripened. It was all going so well. Those were the good old days.



NOW, it’s squash, and beets, and collard greens. The tomato plants are weighed down with green fruit that threaten to ripen any day now. The other tomato plants we started as seeds in the garden, they are hoping to catch up. And the fennel – what WAS I THINKING????? Anyone know how to pickle the stuff? The beans, likewise have put us on notice. In a week or so, they won’t be so kind.  Our patch of dirt has transformed itself over the course of a few short weeks to a living organism that needs daily attention. All it took was rain and sunshine – two commodities that seem to come for free around here and in great abundance. 
 


If you haven’t heard from us lately, blame the weeds. If you don’t hear from us much in the near future, blame the vegetables. We’re both doing fine. We’re just down here on the farm.
 

In : Vegetables 



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Blame it on the weeds

Posted by Marc Kratzschmar on Friday, July 22, 2011 Under: Vegetables


First it was the cress. Lovely little bitter leaves to spice up salads. They were such delicate little leaves. Then salad greens. They were wonderful mixed green and red ruffles of lettuce that showed that we could raise our own food.



Then the bok choy ripened. It was all going so well. Those were the good old days.



NOW, it’s squash, and beets, and collard greens. The tomato plants are weighed down with green fruit that threaten to ripen any day now. The other tomato plants we started as seeds in the garden, they are hoping to catch up. And the fennel – what WAS I THINKING????? Anyone know how to pickle the stuff? The beans, likewise have put us on notice. In a week or so, they won’t be so kind.  Our patch of dirt has transformed itself over the course of a few short weeks to a living organism that needs daily attention. All it took was rain and sunshine – two commodities that seem to come for free around here and in great abundance. 
 


If you haven’t heard from us lately, blame the weeds. If you don’t hear from us much in the near future, blame the vegetables. We’re both doing fine. We’re just down here on the farm.
 

In : Vegetables 



blog comments powered by Disqus

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